Part-time working mums are more productive. Fact.

by pregnancy journalist

I’ve been back at work exactly 2 months. I love it. My boss loves it too. Why? Because I’m so much more productive.
I left work last June to have my first baby and have returned to my old job after 10 months on maternity leave. I’m still working as a Commercial Lead, helping companies to invent, launch and scale new experiences, but I’m part-time now and work 3 days a week.
Now, I can’t deny that I had my reservations about returning to work; will they think I can do the job, what if I can’t do it. I couldn’t have been more wrong. My company and my job has changed beyond recognition but you know what, so have I. Why? Because my time at work is now meaningful and I am super productive.
You may not think it, but part-time working mums are a real asset. Some employers (not mine) think that a working mum may be a hinderance to business. Even my friends questioned my ability to return to the work, more so because I have to travel 35 miles to work, ‘how will you possibly manage’ a couple of them said to me. But you know what? I don’t just manage, I thrive. I have never been more productive or enthusiastic about work.
You may be thinking really? But it’s true, even though I’m working 2 days a week less. Here why:
I am an expert at multi-tasking.
I could multi-task before, but I didn’t consider this to be one of my greatest skills. * This skill has developed and evolved as a result of my home life experiences, having a mental list of what has to be done to keep this little human alive. I am now able to co-ordinate a series of tasks as well as consciously thinking about the impact of each action. This is a super useful skill when you are managing a number of clients across a number of different projects alongside a number of internal stakeholders.
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I am happier and more fulfilled
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I was happy at work before I became a Mum but now I am happier, I have more of a meaning, a purpose. I feel fulfilled and satisfied that I am working to provide a better life for my family. Working part-time I get the best of both worlds and really appreciate both my career and family life. This is reflected in my work; happier me= better output.
I am super efficient.
In short, I don’t waste time. Time is precious to me so I try and make the most of every single minute. I am asking better questions to get the information I need, better at processing and articulating information. I know what I need to do to make the biggest impact and I do it.
I am focused and motivated. 100% of the time.
I don’t procrastinate (well not as much as I used to). I get things done well in the time I have because I don’t want to compromise or miss out the precious time I have with my family. My motivation also comes from my determination to show people that just because I’ve had a baby does not make me any less valuable or less capable than I was before maternity leave.
I welcome the adult interaction.
I love spending time with my little one and meeting with other mums at the ‘play barn’ but * I do enjoy me-time, time away from being a mum. I enjoy, more so than ever, the time I spend having intellectual conversations with colleagues and clients about how to solve problems and come up with new ideas. As a result I actively listen and think more.
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Technology.

Tech plays huge part in my productivity; allowing me to be more connected; at work and at home. I use Skype to video call to my daughter on my walk to and from the station, I use Slack to work remotely and keep up with work comms, and I use Dropbox to access almost everything, anywhere. I know what to use, and when, to make my life as easy as possible.
So, as a part-time working mum, I just get stuff done, better and faster.
Am I selfish that I’ve gone back to work? Maybe I am, I wanted to prove others wrong. And yes, I do feel guilty about leaving my daughter but now I have bigger sense of purpose. You can have it all, you just have to work hard for it.
Here we go….I love going to work. Yes I said it.

This content was originally published here.

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